Jan 162011
 

The only way to learn to manage is to do it;
and the only way to do it, is to do in front of people;
and the only way to do it front of people, is make a bunch of mistakes in a very public forum;
and the only saving grace is that, as an inexperienced manager, it’s really not clear quite how many mistakes are being made.

Me, ranting, in a pub, in West London

This, of course, is of small consolation to the manager’s team.

So the question is, how do we train people for team management without causing pain and suffering to the team? I don’t think there’s a simple answer, but it definitely helped me to have a chance to learn something outside of my professional life.

Back in the days when I had silly hair and green shoes, I used to play guitar in a band. Much like software teams, the problems a band faces are as much social as they are technical. A band needs someone to draw the group together, drive things forward and turn a bunch of dreamy-eyed losers into a bunch of dreamy-eyed losers who, you know, might get a gig. I’d love to think that I was in the band for my guitar excellence, but in truth my job was to keep things together. Sadly the Lonely Crowd never quite made it beyond the indie dives of London town, but it taught me a huge amount that I would later apply in managing teams of software developers.

Trust is key

Without trust it’s not possible for the group to work effectively. I’m not talking about trusting someone with a winning lottery ticket, more that I know I can rely on that person in the context of the project. Once the trust is gone the band is gone, it’s not coming back. Similarly, as a manager, my effectiveness is directly related to the trust within the team.

No need to motivate, just don’t demotivate

Generally, people who form bands are motivated passionate people, no-ones’s getting paid to be there, and even those more interested in impressing girls/boys than music, need to make sure the band is as good as it can be. The easier it is for the group to concentrate on turning ideas into songs and turning songs into set lists, the more satisfying the whole thing will be. So don’t worry about motivation, focus on removing obstacles and dealing with cranky promoters.

Provide a vision

Often the line between creative spark and creative fleurgh is very thin. Someone has to provide a vision for the group to work towards. In my case this meant coming to the band with rough song ideas, I’d bleed over these things in my bedroom, secretly very proud of my work, only for the rest of the guys to mutate it into something excellent. The point is that without that first step nothing would have happened. Remember that the aim is not to be the best musician, it’s to make the best musicians better.

Roles and responsibilities

A band has distinct roles, when people talk about the Beatles they rarely start with George Harrison, but his considered rhythm guitar parts made it possible for Lennon and McCartney to steal the show, similarly Bill and Ted were never going to get anywhere on their own. The point is that everyone needs to understand where they fit and exactly what they bring to the group, if the drummer is thinking like a lead guitarist, the band will sound awful no matter what.

Feedback

Without good feedback the music will suffer, either through a lack of innovation or through a lack of quality control. The key is finding a way to express your thoughts, good or bad, without it being taken personally. Thinking managerially, the aim should be that the whole group can provide good feedback. Doing so effectively requires a high level of trust within the group as well as a sense of when to intervene if the criticism becomes destructive.

Limit work in progress

Getting a song to a performable state is massive step. It brings the group together and feels like progress. It’s better to have three presentable songs than nine nearly finished ‘things’, not least because it then provides a means for feedback from outside of the group.

Manage internal tensions

Where passionate people collaborate there will always be differences in opinion. Impassioned debate is healthy and a sign that band mates care about the project, but sometimes things get out of hand and it’s necessary for a third party to mediate. Generally it comes down to a breakdown in communication and trust, problems are often best fixed away from the rehearsal room and after the event once all concerned have had a chance to calm down.

So what are you saying Neil, before a new manager starts out they should spend three years in Spinal Tap? Hardly, but training for people management is a tricky subject. At some point it’s necessary to dive in with a real team, accept that mistakes will be made and aim to learn very quickly indeed. The thing is there are plenty of opportunities to gain an introduction outside of work, for me it was guitar wrangling, I’d love to hear what other people have found helpful.

  4 Responses to “What being in a band taught me about management”

  1. […] Article: What being in a band taught me about management […]

  2. For me, without a shadow of a doubt, captain of my Cambridge College rowing team.

    Rowing is taken very seriously in Cambridge (as I’m sure you all know!) and managing the expectations of 30 some adolescent, hot-headed and testosterone guys was big challenge. Running committee meetings was similarly exciting.

    In many ways it was very similar to work. Not enough resources, not enough time, big jobs to finish, everyone wanting to put in their best performance.

    And my most important contribution? Pep talks to squads or individuals. Keeping motivation and keeping the whole team focused on the same goal.

    Just like the day job :)

  3. @mrtom
    Hah, yeah good example. You’re talking about captaincy of the entire club, but sports teams are an interesting analogy. In a sports team there is a naturally a competitive edge between team mates since being dropped from the team is common place. In fact it’s seen as a vital motivator knowing that if you’re not at least as good the person waiting in the wings you’re gone. I’m not sure it would be considered quite so motivating for a software developer.

  4. […] What being in a band taught me about management by Neil Johnson – “Limit work in progress – Getting a song to a performable state is massive step. It brings the group together and feels like progress. It’s better to have three presentable songs than nine nearly finished ‘things’, not least because it then provides a means for feedback from outside of the group.” […]

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